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Paul's Cathedral. Its graceful dome, surmounted with the golden cross, rises high above the noise and bustle of the City; and when, on any day in the week, you listen to the music of the Cathedral service, you are reminded of a quiet island in the midst of a stormy sea. All around the stately pile is every of the active life which tells of the presence of a vast population. Eastward of the building flows a great stream of traffic through Cheap- sid; westward ic gets down Ludgate-hill towards Fleet-strett and the Strand, while the towering warehouses of Cannon-street, immediately south of the structure, are ever receiving new acquisitions and loading vehicles of all descriptions with their contents.

The churchyard itself is an open space of considerable size, the resting-place of many a citizen of the past century, of credit and renown in its commercial annals. The Corporation of London have determined to follow the example set by some of the metropolitan vestries, which have con- verted the old disused parish churchyards into gardens for the recreation of the people.

There are many of these in the very heart and centre of the capital, some of the hetones flat upon the ground, others sadly out of the perpendicular, a curious spectator occasionally gazing through the rusty and neg- lected railings, and pausing in his march through life to contemplate the picture of silence and desolation within. However, one after another of these places has been turned into a garden, not eternally closed, as after the fashion of the old churchyard, but open to the people under proper regulations, and made bright and cheerful with shrubs and flowers.

In the crowded districts of St. Pancras, on the north side of the river, and of Bermondsey upon the south, where the inhabitants are crowded in with houses for miles around, these gardens are held in high appreciation and now St. Paul's Churchyard is to be treated similarly.

The proposed alteration will be a great gain for the exterior beauty of the building, on the interior of which so much care and money are being spent. And when St. Paul's has its new carillon of chimes, as it soon will have, it will furnish yet another proof that in an age in which such strongly utili- tarian views prevail, the attention of the ruling powers in the City of London is directed to the sugges- tive, as represented by the bells, and to the beautiful, aa typified by the garden-lessons, which are nowhere more in place than in the midst of the City of London.

The First of September ia a date marked by the almanacks as the beginning of the partridge shooting seasoD, which thus speedily follows that set apart for the slaughter of the grouse. September also ushers in the commencement of barley harvest, and the opening of autumn. Before its arrival, however, the sighing of the wind through the trees, and the scattering of the leaves upon the ground, have told a tale which does not require the confirmation of September to be obvious to all.

As the sound of the wind in the gradually darkening days sometimes rises into a moan, it seems in the mind of the imaginative to utter a wail over the departure of the brief but brilliant summer, one which has given the land a bounteous har- vest, for there can be no doubt that the ingathering will be better than it was in either or last year. The recent wet weather, while it has hampered to some degree the operations of the reaper, has been beneficial to the roots, which had rather suffered in the sun- parched soil. As the harvest abroad has not been so good as in years, it is gratifying to find the home yield of our own English acres so satisfactory.

The thanksgiving festivals will this year have a very substantial foundation. Exploration of been carried out to such an extent e Atlantic, the dee' of "illev, midway abor trai. So far as scientific men can luiet reigns in those vast depths of 3 the clouds there ia a region of per- n the bed of the ocean everlasting mbroken by the currents immediately 3 as by the influences which affect the ibled waves.

In all ages the love of the marvellous has been a most fascinating theme for the adventurous amongst men; and so long as the North Pole remains undiscovered, if it is for centuries to come, so long will endeavours be made to get there. We have had hie s from the officers in the last expedi- 1 of the sufferings undergone in these frightful DS, and to a temperature to which the human 3 was never before subjected.

The late King of the Bel- ;ians, Leopold I. He was a valued counsellor of our own Queen, more especially after the death of the Prince Consort; and often enough crossed a wintry ilea to come over to this country, "tind consult with our own Sovereign. Brussels is within such an easy distance of our snores, that it can be reached in less time than many parts of our own islands and the competition of the railways makes a trip to the Belgian capital one each as even the mechanic and the artisan can afford and enjoy.

The departure of her Majesty for Scotland generally follows the prorogation of Parliament by a few days, -id is the final indication of that suspension of tive social life which reigns in the west-end of 3ndon during the early weeks of autumn. As one our men-of-war always acts as a guard ship during e Queen's stay at Osborne, so when the Sovereign is Balmoral, a Cabinet Minister is invariably in at- ndance. The Ministers take the duty in turn for a rtnight or three weeks at a time, the Secretaries State taking the largest proportion of the work.

The Iinister in attendance upon the Queen then res is colleagues, but he is absent from the Sovereign no onger than is positively necessary. Indeed a Vlinister has been known to leave Balmoral on Tues- lay night to be present at a Cabinet Council held in London on Wednesday afternoon, and to be back to Balmoral again by Thursday night, having within the forty-eight hours travelled 1, miles in order to perform his obligations to the State.

Such journeys could not, of course, be undertaken by those of the Ministers wh have reached man's matnrer age. Lord Palmerston and Lord Russell seldom penetrated as far as Balmoral. When the latter reed the Premiership, inthe Queen was in Scotland. It is customary for the Prime Minister, on such occa- sions, personally to place his reation in her Majesty's hands but Lord Russell's health would not allow him to perform such a journey, and the duty was entrusted to a special messenger.

The long-prevailing depression in trade has told ia different ways in both town and country. There is, however, hope that the country has seen the worst of the quiet time through which it has passed. When a nation feels that it is on the verge of war, capital is paralysed, and industry is enfeebled hut when the war-cloud has been rolled away, trade may well throw over its timidity, and again launch forth into those busy channels which bespeak the existence of a prosperous and contented people.

Although we have not yet quite solved the problem what to do with our discharged soldiers, the annual circular of the Corps of Commissionaires seems to hint at some solution of the difficulty. The Com- missionaires are a most useful body of men, innearly half of whom were formerly non- commissioned officers, and are now regularly em- ployed of public messengers. Ia this capacity they are as trustworthy as they are useful, and they appear to have almost more to do than they can manage. The Post-office employs them more widely than any other Government department; their work, however, is not confined to London, although it is principally carried on the capital.

The commission- aires are to be found in our theatres, our large hotels, and in our chief houses of business. They are, ac- cording to this circular, thoroughly well provided for and although all old soldiers do not become public messengers when they leave the army, it is satisfactory to know that a system works well which by providing a livelihood for the men after they are no longer needed for constant military service, helps to make popular the defensive forces of the country.

In con- nection with this subject a reference to the foundation of our reserve system may not be out of place. Her Majesty, through the Commander-in-Chief, has borne testimony to the alacrity with which the reserve men left their occupations and their homes, to respond to the call which the country made upon their services. When they were disbanded, many of them found their situations filled, so that they have had to face priva- tion and suffering in consequence of the demand which was made upon them by the nation. This is not calculated to ensure popularity for the continued emolument of the reserve forces—a point well werth considering by a people which has now become a Con- tinental Power, and may have at any time to call up all the military strength at its command.

The popular watenng-placea which have sprung up some nine miles from New York present several features of interest to those who are just now re- newing their annual acquaintance with similar resorts around our own coasts.

Within the past few years the narrow strip 9f white sand known as Coney Island has become what is described as one vast hotel. Coney Island is about four miles and a half long and a mile and a halt broad yet within this space five watering-places have appeared, having between them eome twenty hotels and six lines of railway. The aristocratic resort is the Manhattan beach, where there are two huge bathing pavilions. One is devoted to the ladies, over 1, of whom use this monster bathing machine daily.

It contains rooms, fitted with gas and running water and other appointments of comfortable and convenient dressing rooms, and being contiguous to the sands, is a vast improvement on the wretched little boxes on wheels with which most of our seaside resorts make us familiar.

There is a similar pavilion for gentlemen, containing rooms. For the amuse- ment of those who do not bathe a large amphitheatre has been erected in front of the beach, affording a good view of all that goes on there. Refreshment bars are provided here and a band of music, and the public are admitted at a charge of ten cents. The most striking feature in connection with the bathing at Coney Island, however, is the electric light that has been recently established on the Manhattan beaeh, for the purpose of enabling visitors to take advantage of the tide after dark.

Three magneto- electric machines are employed, and by means of a steam engine, a light is produced equal to 3, candles, and said to be capable of exercising an ap- preciable influence five or six miles out at sea. It has become the fashion to bathe under this novel illumina- tion, and the spectacular effect of the waves, and the quaint costumes of the bathers are described as very singular, and it is a very strong inducement to visitors to pay their 10 cents, for admission to the spectators' amphitheatre.

A Liverpool paper states that an American gentle- man had the opportunity at the Exchange Newsroom, on Saturday, of explaining to the commercial men of Liverpool his self-acting electric fire alarm. The in- vention is described as an apparatus by which in a very simple, inexpensive manner an electric al is given by a self-acting appliance from any part of any warehouse or building as soon as the temperature is unduly raised, the sigual being communicated to the fire brigade station acquainting them instantaneously of the very commencement of a fire and of its locality.

By this notice the attendance of the engines at a fire is secured at the earliest possible moment. A small metal box, called a thermostat, holds within it, insulated at one end by a phce of ebonite, a spring composed of brass on one side and platinum on the other. The brass expands readily with the heat, the platinum very slowly, and, therefore, when any unusual increase of temperature takes place, the ppring is brought into contact with a small screw point.

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The spring is connected with an earth wire at the place which it is wished to protect. Another wire, sufficing for many buildings, communicates with the fire brigade station. At the firs brigade there is a galvanic battery, one pole of which is put into the earth, and the other is in communication with the wire leading from the various premises to be protected.

Directly the spring of the thermostat is expanded by any abnormal heat in the room in which it is placed, the earth wire is put into commuuication with the brigade wire, and thus the electrical circuit is complete.

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This rings a bell at once at the fire brigade, calling attention to the fact that there is a fire, or an improper heat, in the particular building indicated by the ap- paratus. The thermostats should b. Directly any un- usual heat arises it will affect one or more of the ther- mostats, and before the fire has made any headway at all the brigade will be at the place. In New York, where the electric alarm is largely in operation, the custom is to set the thermostats to go off at degrees of heat; in England the necessary degree would be about in the theatres and other places where gas is much burnt perhaps a little higher.

The American papers received this week give harrowing details respecting the spread of yellow fever n the Southern States of North America. Residents of the infected districts were fleeing to Washington and to other places outside the line of the disease. At latest s the alarming increase of the epidemic in the towns and cities along the Mississippi River had produced great consternation at Washington, and it was recommended that the baggage of persons arriving from the South should be disinfected, and that the passengers themselves should be kept nnder in- spection for seven days.

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At Grenada, Mississippi, there were 12 cases on August 15, and the white population was reduced to A telegram from the acting mayor of Grenada on the 14th of August to the Mayor of Wilmington, says:—"Help me to pay nurses and bury the dead. Our town is a graveyard. We need help.

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